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Beeston & District Local History Society



                   
            Here are details of our current meetings programme and our newsletter.



                      
Meetings are held on the third Wednesday of each month, at
The Chilwell Memorial Institute, 129 High Road, Chilwell, Nottingham NG9 4AT
Doors open at 7.15pm and the meetings start at 7.30 pm.

Facilities
Tea, coffee and biscuits are available at each meeting and Society publications are available to purchase. The hall is equipped with a sound and induction loop system.


The Society arranges public local history displays from time to time including taking part in the Heritage Open Day each year. Future events will be announced on this page.


OUR PROGRAMME OF SPEAKERS

2018

November 21     Emma Wilmott - forgotten artist of the Dukeries. Richard Gaunt
                                                                                                    
December  19       Quiz and Seasonal refreshments.

PROGRAMME 2019

Jan-16  ROBERT MEE                BRADSHAW'S AND AN EARLY RAILWAY TOUR 
Feb-20  RICHARD GAUNT          THE PENTRICH REBELLION 
Mar-20 ANN FEATHERSTONE     FOOLS AND HORSES  - THE VICTORIAN CIRCUS 
Apr-17 JO GOLBY                    LAURA ASHLEY
May-15 PAUL SWIFT                NOTTINGHAM CITY HOSPITAL
Jun-19 JOHN BECKETT             THE GREAT ESCAPE FROM SUTTON BONINGTON
Jul-17                     WOLLATON DOVECOTE VISIT  
Aug-21  JANINE TANNER          NOTTINGHAM ‘S VICTORIA STATION 
Sep-18 CHRIS  WEIR    SECRETS MYSTERIES AND CURIOSITIES OF NOTTINGHAM
Oct-16 AGM       Plus  JILL OAKLAND CORDWAINER TO CANADA - A LOCAL BOOTMAKER AND FAMILY
Nov-20 JULIA POWELL             DAME LAURA KNIGHT - LONG EATON BORN ARTIST
Dec-18                                  CHRISTMAS FUDDLE AND QUIZ
     


NEWSLETTER 31   
By Carole White

HERITAGE OPEN DAY
8th September  
This  year’s  H.O.D.  was  held  at
Barton’s, High   Road,   Chilwell. There were  plenty  of  photos  on display and maps of local interest. Members of the public commented on what a fine display our archivists had on show. Many thanks again for all who helped on the day and behind the scenes.

SEPTEMBER 19th Meeting:-
TRACING BINGHAM’S HISTORY   Speaker  - Geoff Ashton
           Bingham has been continuously occupied since Neolithic times. There was significant Roman activity at the town and fort of Margidunum to the north. Bingham is mentioned briefly in the Domesday Book.
           For 500 years the parish was in the hands of the Stanhope family of Shelford , later the Earls of Chesterfield, and then the Carnarvons until 1921.
           The weekly Thursday market was established by Royal Charter in 1314. Although discontinued by 1880 it was successfully revived in 1975. Some interesting buildings still remain in Bingham. In one of the cottages there is a fine 18th century bread oven in the basement which could bake 200 loaves at a time. The Methodist Chapel was opened in 1818 by the followers of John Wesley who had preached in the market place in 1770. During some excavations they found some Wig Curlers and apparently in 1793 there was a Wig Maker residing in Bingham. Did they belong to him? Who knows? A Roman well was rescued from the bulldozers and every brick was numbered, then replaced in the cemetery. This has been converted into an arboretum , with information boards and a guide to the trees.

17th OCTOBER Meeting:-
AGM plus talk on INHAM NOOK ESTATE by Jill Oakland and photographic display by Gill Morral.
          As our President was unable to be with us on the night, his report and comments were read out by Jill Oakland.

President’s message:-I believe the Society has once again lived up to its reputation of providing an interesting mix of speakers over the year. From Reform Act to Richard III, from Bingham to Boots to Professor John Beckett talking about the Chilwell Explosion,  where there was standing room only on this night. I went to the very well attended HOD display in September at Barton’s and was impressed by the spacious layout and by the detailed information on show.
This Society must surely be enabled to continue. So I do ask some of you to come forward to join the committee and have the satisfaction of knowing that by helping the Society to continue, you preserve the Society as the custodians of the Beeston area’s history and wish the Society well for the future.

Message from our Chairman:- John Becket’s talk on The Chilwell Explosion Revisited brought us hordes of visitors and a welcome sum of money. However, the prospects for next year are not as bright, and it is with sorrow that we will have to start dismantling our archives and planning to vacate Oban House, as it’s too costly to stay there. Gill Morral our archivist has done a wonderful job again, and our excellent displays have travelled far and wide from Rufford Abbey to Trent Bridge Cricket Ground, Beeston Carnival and Heritage Open Day. If this society is to continue we need new members and more people to serve on the committee, help with sales, make refreshments, secretarial tasks and help with fund raising. Is there anyone who knows a cheaper place to keep our archives safe? It would be a crying shame if our archives had to be broken up through lack of support. It was agreed that the subs will stay the same -£20.00 per year and £2.50p each month for visitors.
The committee are now :- Ray Howard, Jill Oakland, Rod Sladen, Maureen Rushton, Gill Morral, Alan Windsor and Dr. John Patrick.

INHAM NOOK ESTATE
          Jill’s talk took us from farmland to housing estate. Chilwell had four mentions in the Domesday Book, three in the Barton-in-Fabis entry and one in Toton Manor. Inham Nook is a field name, first appearing in the Charlton family papers and it means a secluded nook or corner. The street names on the estate came from field names and owner names, e.g. Marriott and Oak Acre. Several farms which stood on the site were compulsory purchased for the building of the houses. It was hoped that people with a variety of jobs would take up residence on the estate.  They were modern houses with three rooms downstairs, two or three bedrooms and a bathroom with inside toilet. Newcomers to the estate complained that mud was getting all over pram wheels as some of the roads were still being made. In 1946 Beeston and Stapleford UDC put out the first tenders for street works and house building. The street names as far as Wentworth Road were agreed and building commenced in October 1947. In 1948 more houses were built and Barton’s bus company agreed to re-route the 33 bus to serve the estate. The estate also had to incorporate shops, a doctors surgery, a pub, a school (Sunnyside School was opened in 1957), and a church (St Barnabas Church opened in 1957 and Inham Nook Methodist Church in 1963). On a site adjoining the council house estate a large children’s park was built. This was opened by Dickie Henderson in 1963.
WANTED
Good quality, new or unused gifts and local books are needed to sell at our Christmas stall on Saturday November 24th at Chilwell Road Methodist Church 10.00am – 11.30am.     Suitable articles can
be brought to our next monthly meeting or brought
to church on the day of sale.

a very happy Christmas to all our members & FRIENDS